Several different jewelry pieces accompany the pollera and are worn on the head, ears, neck, chest, and to adorn the dress itself.

Ornamental hair combs made of gold with a straight or oval cut and frequently decorated with pearls or sparkly gemstones frame the lady's crown.

Other major golden jewelry pieces for the head are: smaller hair combs, a palm-leaf dagger to one side of the head, and small patches or "golden thoughts" on the temples.

To top it all off, an elaborate hair adornment customarily wraps her head in a flexible floral wreath made of shiny metal, satin, fish scales, pearls, and colored glass or plastic beads. When the woman dances, this tembleque will delicately tremble along and imitate the natural movement of carnations and other countryside flowers.

In addition to such popular floral designs as guate flower, bride's bouquet, and white musk roses, the headdress may imitate animals like the scorpion or dragonfly, or represent other original designs inspired from nature.

Considered the most beautiful costume in the world, the Panamanian pollera is a colorful dress that exudes splendor, distinction, and elegance. Artisans execute every detail involved in the sewing, art, design, and style of each variety, the most well known being: white gala attire (Pollera Santeña); chintz peasant dress (Pollera Montuna); with openwork darning,embroidery, or cross-stitch (Pollera con Labores); household blouse (La Basquiña); and with colorfully striped ribbons (La Pollera Tireada).

The pollera consists of two major pieces, a blouse and a long skirt, both decorated in fine cloth.

The Azuero Peninsula, comprising the provinces of Herrera, Los Santos and part of Veraguas, is where to today artisans conserve the authenticity of the delicate and laborious process of tailoring polleras.

The pollera can be made from the following fabrics:

Linen: Tela de Hilo, El Coco, La Crea de Hilo, El Holán de Motitas

Cotton: El Percal, La Tela Confusa, El Opal, El Anjeo, La Zaraza

Every Panamanian woman dreams of wearing a pollera, which makes her feel proud of the customs and traditions that enrich this isthmus.

It's important to note that the pollera can come in any color, as with the hair adornments and shoes, all depending on its style, type, and category.


Panama proudly showcases the many customs and traditions that make up its rich culture, from diverse dances to colorful clothing.

Today we will focus on the national costume called pollera and pay homage to the seamstresses and artisans who play a fundamental role in creating such important articles that have gained world renown for their beauty and singularity.

The essence of the people in each region of the country is reflected and highlighted through the history behind their individual pollera ensemble. 

The 5.6% growth in tourism activity in Panama during 2013 is considered "very satisfactory" to the Deputy Administrator of the Panama Tourism Authority, Ernesto Orillac, according to official reports.

Known as one of the beaches with the most tourism development and infrastructure in the country, excellent hotels, supermarkets, restaurants, banks, private homes and housing projects, and all sorts of commercial services have been attracted to Coronado.